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A volunteer clearing out trash in a local nature spot

How Caregivers Can Get Involved in the Community

Many times, people think of volunteering or being involved in the community as another activity to add to their to-do list. This can especially be the case when the project we have signed on for is out of our realm of interest. Caregivers can also often feel they do not have enough time to engage in activities they enjoy. However, finding the perfectly tailored volunteer opportunity or community engagement program can be key to gratification in our personal lives.

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By Abbey Carney | 07/15/2022

Cordell, A. (2021, September 16). 4 Rewards to Bridging the Generations. Guideposts. https://www.guideposts.org/caregiving/family-caregiving/aging-parents/4-rewards-to-bridging-the-generations

Hayes, J. (2022, February 11). Helping Older Adults Stay Active Indoors During Winter. Active Daily Living. https://www.activedailyliving.com/Caregiver/Article/2361

Age-friendly communities can help older adults live active, vibrant lives with local support

Advocating as a Caregiver for the Creation of Age-Friendly Communities

Creating age-friendly communities can be beneficial to the well-being of not only older adults, but also those who care for them, regardless of age. These communities can provide older adults with the means to age in place with the support of family and friend caregivers. As we care for loved ones, we can also be part of the movement to promote age-friendly communities and advocate for change.

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By Branka Primetica | 03/15/2022

An older adult and young teen on a walk together

Four Benefits of Intergenerational Programming

With the widespread independent lifestyle of many American families, older loved ones are becoming increasingly separated from their families and other support systems. The COVID-19 pandemic has only increased these challenges. An estimated 27 percent of older adults age 60 years and older live alone in the U.S. and would benefit greatly from social interaction. According to Generations United, a national organization that focuses on intergenerational collaboration, two in three Americans would like to spend more time with others outside of their age group.

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By Ashlee Cordell | 12/15/2021