Asset Publisher

View Details

Behavioral Health Services

Our Behavioral Health Services provide holistic mental health care to help adults 55 and older stabilize behavioral health symptoms.

View Details >>
View Details

Home-Delivered Meals

Our Home-Delivered Meals Program offers home delivery service of nutritious hot and cold meals to older adults who are unable to shop for or prepare meals independently.

View Details >>
View Details

Senior Companion

Our Senior Companion Program connects older adults with a trained peer volunteer who can offer companionship and minimize isolation.

View Details >>
View Details

Social Work

Our Social Work Program addresses concerns of older adults and caregivers, including medical conditions, quality of life, and environmental health issues.

View Details >>
View Details

WeCare...because you do℠

WeCare is a telephone- and email-based care coaching program designed to assist and support older adults living with chronic conditions and their caregivers.

View Details >>

Rose Centers for Aging Well

Resources

Resources

Please enter a date in the format M M / d d / y y y y
A caregiver taking a moment of respite

What Does Wellness Look Like for Dementia Caregivers?

Anyone providing care for a loved one with dementia knows how stressful it can be. Not only can the tasks involved be challenging and exhausting, but there is a very emotional level as well. But even with all the challenges , caregivers often neglect self-care, infrequently check in on their own health and either don’t know about or don’t use opportunities for respite.

Read More

By Julie Hayes | 07/15/2022

A caregiver chatting with her older adult father

Caregiving for Older Male Loved Ones

Every caregiving journey is unique, and there are so many factors that can change the experience. Your loved one’s family history, age, diet and ethnicity are all things that can affect his or her wellness, while their temperament, ability to communicate, values and beliefs can all impact the smoothness of providing care. Biological sex can also play a role. Those who care for the important men in their lives—fathers, spouses, partners, brothers, uncles, grandfathers, and many more—may experience different challenges than those caring for women.

Read More

By Julie Hayes | 06/15/2022

A caregiver supporting their older loved one with a hand on the shoulder

Helping Older Loved Ones Face Changes in Mental Health

For older adults, mental illness is a conversation made difficult by stereotypes. Assumptions like “Old people are just stubborn” or “He’s become mean as he’s aged” cause many to dismiss mental illness in older adults. For caregivers, messages like these can make it difficult to differentiate mental illness from what are considered “normal parts of aging.”

Read More

By Kerstin Yoder | 05/16/2022

After being diagnosed with dementia, it's important to plan for the future as soon as possible

Preparing for Your Future After an Early Onset Dementia Diagnosis

A diagnosis of dementia can be devastating no matter your age. However, older adults, especially those over the age of 65, tend to be more aware of the possibility of dementia, and know that their risk statistically increases each year. But for younger adults, being diagnosed with dementia between the ages of 30 and 60 is not only upsetting—it can be outright shocking.

Read More

By Julie Hayes | 03/15/2022

A clock drawn by an older adult with numbers in the incorrect order. This suggests that the older adult may have dementia

What to Know About Dementia Screening and Assessment Tools

If you’re a family member, friend or caregiver who suspects a loved one might have dementia, it’s important to know about cognitive screening and assessment tools. Since there is no one biological marker or blood test to pinpoint dementia, cognitive tests help doctors evaluate the state of your loved one’s memory, recall, language recognition and ability to follow instructions. If you plan to bring your loved one to a doctor, a combination of tests may be used to screen your loved one for dementia. And, if you are hesitant to consult a doctor just yet, many of these tests include questions that you can try asking your loved one yourself to help you confirm your suspicions. 

Read More

By Julie Hayes | 02/15/2022