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Self-Esteem Boosting Tips for Older Adults

Self-esteem is a person’s evaluation of their own worth. Simply put, it is what someone thinks of themself, whether positive or negative. Our concept of self-esteem begins in early childhood and is formed by the image we build for ourselves through experiences with people and different situations. The things we experience as a child initially form a foundation in shaping our self-esteem. Successes; failures; and how we are treated by members of our families, teachers, religious authorities, friends, etc., contribute to a basic sense of self.

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By Tamar Cooper | 02/15/2021

It's Okay to Feel: The Emotional Side of Caregiving

Let’s get real about the emotional side of caregiving. As a caregiver you may feel many different emotions: stress, fear, anger, resentment, joy. It’s important to remember that your feelings are valid and important, whether they’re good or bad feelings. This webinar will offer tips on coping with the various emotions you may face as a caregiver.

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By Lisa Weitzman | 02/03/2021

Washington Update

A discussion on developments in Washington DC, including the new Administration, 117th Congress and new majority in the Senate.

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By Orion Bell, Bob Blancato, Meredith Ponder Whitmire | 01/29/2021

Preparing for Taking on Caregiving Responsibilities

When preparing for big life events, many families like to come up with a plan. But when it comes to caregiving, many families are not as proactive, even though over 34 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult age 50 or older. In fact, many families wait until a crisis happens to begin important discussions, which can leave them scrambling to figure out care options. When planning for our future caregiving responsibilities, or preparing our loved ones to take on our own care as we age, we should hold discussions about finances, as well as values and preferences to help develop a successful caregiving plan.

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By Sara Powers, PhD | 01/15/2021

Coping Strategies for Caregivers After the Death of a Loved One

Everyone grieves in their own way after the death of a loved one. There is no normal timeline for grief. We may feel sadness, frustration, guilt or even failure and anger. We may want to be loud or quiet; alone or surrounded by community. We may experience insomnia, loss of appetite or even have difficulty breathing. There are a lot of normal reactions to grief, both physically and mentally. We should give ourselves permission to express our grief however we are feeling it, whenever we are feeling it. Grief is messy, but as we navigate the grief of losing a loved one, it is important to connect with resources that can help us through this time.

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By Sarah Nicolay | 01/15/2021