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Identifying Risks and Preventing Falls for Older Adults

Winter weather can be beautiful, but along with the picturesque snow comes the less ideal increase to falls caused by ice and slush. While falls can be dangerous for people of all ages, they are a particular risk to older loved ones. According to the CDC Injury Center, around 25 percent of adults aged 65 and over will experience a fall over the course of a year. These falls are the cause of more than 2.8 million injuries that require hospital treatment, such as hip fractures and traumatic brain injury, resulting in over 800,000 hospitalizations and more than 27,700 deaths annually. 

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By Julie Hayes | 02/15/2021

When Parents Weren’t There For You: What Are Your Responsibilities?

There is a tie that binds the adult child to their parent, be it a sense of loyalty, duty or compassion. So how does the adult child provide care for their aging parent after this type of childhood? If you are in this situation, you may wonder if you should find it within yourself to take on the role of caregiver. But if you do, what will that role look like?

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By Lauri Scharf | 02/15/2021

Preparing for Taking on Caregiving Responsibilities

When preparing for big life events, many families like to come up with a plan. But when it comes to caregiving, many families are not as proactive, even though over 34 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult age 50 or older. In fact, many families wait until a crisis happens to begin important discussions, which can leave them scrambling to figure out care options. When planning for our future caregiving responsibilities, or preparing our loved ones to take on our own care as we age, we should hold discussions about finances, as well as values and preferences to help develop a successful caregiving plan.

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By Sara Powers, PhD | 01/15/2021

Coping Strategies for Caregivers After the Death of a Loved One

Everyone grieves in their own way after the death of a loved one. There is no normal timeline for grief. We may feel sadness, frustration, guilt or even failure and anger. We may want to be loud or quiet; alone or surrounded by community. We may experience insomnia, loss of appetite or even have difficulty breathing. There are a lot of normal reactions to grief, both physically and mentally. We should give ourselves permission to express our grief however we are feeling it, whenever we are feeling it. Grief is messy, but as we navigate the grief of losing a loved one, it is important to connect with resources that can help us through this time.

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By Sarah Nicolay | 01/15/2021

Preparing Your Home for Hospice

If the loved one we care for is in the advanced stages of a disease and we’ve decided that we would like them to be in as much comfort as possible in familiar surroundings, home hospice may be the right choice. However, arranging a loved one’s home or our own for a hospice stay takes some thought and preparation. We likely don’t want the place to look like a hospital, but we need to have all of the necessary equipment the loved one we care for requires.

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01/15/2021