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Bibbo, J., Rodriguez, K. E., & O'Haire, M. E. (2019). Impact of Service Dogs on Family Members' Psychosocial Functioning. The American journal of occupational therapy : official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association, 73(3), 7303205120p1–7303205120p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2019.031690

Ciancibello, A. (2019, June 12). Resources for Finding Home Care for a Loved One. Retrieved from https://www.guideposts.org/caregiving/resource-center/resources-for-finding-home-care-for-a-loved-one.

A long-distance caregiver working from their laptop

Caring From a Distance

Do you have to travel over 60 minutes to reach your loved one? Does this distance sometimes interfere with your caregiving responsibilities or prevent you from giving the care your loved one needs? If so, you may be considered a long-distance caregiver. Providing care from afar can complicate the caregiving experience, but there are tools, resources and new technological advancements that can help us all approach the distance in a more effective way.

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By Sara Powers, PhD | 06/12/2019

Older adults together with loved ones

The Impact of Caregiving on Family Members and Friends

Family members and friends provide an average of 80% of the help needed by older adults who are unable to independently complete all their daily activities due to an illness or disability. While assistance from professionals or paid helpers may also be beneficial, most of the time, family members and friends are the main source of support, with one or more assisting and serving in the role of caregiver.

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By David Bass, PhD | 06/12/2019

A SHARE for Dementia family discussing future plans with a counselor

Planning for the Future after a Dementia Diagnosis: Why Working Together Is Important

If we are caring for a loved one who has recently been diagnosed with dementia or a related disorder such as Alzheimer’s Disease, it can feel devastating. Often, families avoid having discussions with their loved one about what the diagnosis could mean for their future out of fear. As the disease progresses over time, we may find ourselves as a caregiver in the position of making important care or health-related decisions for a loved one in a time of crisis, even if we have never previously discussed with our loved one what kind of care they would prefer. As a result, we may feel guilty about having to make decisions on our loved one’s behalf, without prior knowledge of their care values and preferences.

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By Silvia Orsulic-Jeras | 06/12/2019